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We all experienced a different extreme, some did not touch another human for nine months or more, some went stir crazy with six children locked within four walls, some experienced long-term relationship separations, some suffered mental illness, some were paralysed by personal grief at the loss of a loved one and that is just the surface.

Dancing at Midnight is a piece about HOPE.

The work focuses on the metaphor of body language, gestures and subtle nuances of human communication. I wanted to illustrate the joyful dance between people when they share close proximity, harmony & good times.

The translucent glass plays magically with light; In the video presentation I bring the work to life, give it a heartbeat and breath. As a sculpture the work is a moment in time, with you, the viewer as witness.

During the making process I twisted, formed and gestured each element of glass to move in its own fluid way. When these elements came together, the piece carries conversations, the components relating and responding to each other, physically, spiritually and mentally as we all did before lock down.

Here is the link to the video presentation of the artwork.

Soundtrack is titled Kothbiro by Singer/Songwriter Ayub Ogada

Our oceans cover 71 per cent of the planet and largely govern our climate by performing the majority of the world’s photosynthesis, the production of our oxygen. They support organisms such as phytoplankton which clean as much CO2 from the atmosphere each year as all rainforests.

Evidence suggests ocean currents are slowing down and/or could stop if cold fresh water makes its way into the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. This could occur if global warming causes large-scale melting of arctic sea ice and the Greenland ice sheet. This halt in the current could take centuries or just a few years. Either would cause planet-wide devastating changes in climate.
The Dymaxion Map, was created by mathematician, inventor and futurist, R. Buckminster Fuller. The Dymaxion Map is widely considered the most accurate rendition of the relationships of the earth’s continents.

By turning the globe into a series of triangles Fuller could unfold the Earth from a sphere into a flat plane and detail the land formations and their relationships to each other with tremendous accuracy. Our One World Island encapsulates these ideas to create a poetic expression of the fragility of our planet bringing to the forefront a consciousness of the world’s oceans.
The work was developed to satisfy the context and design of the foyer, surrounded by glass and highly visible through the night the Dymaxion map was erected onto a wall of Barrisol with a series of 1400 LED lights installed behind, the wall is programmed to change colour at certain time durations.

My concept for the illumination of the wall has two elements, the chosen colours and time/duration. The colours are in response to seasonal shifts; in the crisp icy cool of winter a warm earthy range would illuminate the foyer space creating a sense of comfort and wellbeing, in the heat of summer the colours would be changed to a crisp cool spectrum offering refreshing respite from the intensity of the heat and humidity. My choice of saturation was low creating a subtle suggestion of this warmth and coolness to purposefully allow the focus to be directed towards the Dymaxion map and the concept & content of the work Our One World Island.

The desired time duration of the colour loop was to be a 30-hour cycle, with a suggested hold of an hour for each colour with a half hour fade in/out time to the next. The notion being; if one travelled passed and/or arrived at the building at the same time each day the colour/mood would be different, the work would be seen to be evolving, alive and withholding a personality, inspiring investigation and inviting a sense of a relationship with the work. The change in colour would not be noticeable if you stood in front of the work for a short period but rather it would be recognised if you were in a meeting for an hour and returned to the foyer, I believe the speed of change would support a calm and grounded mood within the building.

The crystal is pre-warmed in a kiln and then picked up on a blow pipe in the hot shop, the glass is blown and free formed into it’s rough shape.

Cooled down to room temperature the Amulet ‘blank’ is carved into a more defined form using a lathe, the glass may pass through two grades of diamond before being ready for the next process.

Now the Amulet is in it’s final form with a smooth surface the process moves to the smaller engraving lathe to work on the surface texture. Small diamond wheels are used to carve marks in the surface, this technique is inspired and developed from the traditional Venetian technique known as Battuto. I can choose from a number of wheels with different profiles in both stone and diamond all delivering very different effects upon the glass. It takes considerable time to work both the front and back of the Amulet, the surfaces will be checked over and over to see that no area has gone untouched.

Once satisfied with the result I hand rub the surface with fine emery to polish the high ground, the different surface textures and treatments become highlighted when seen under moving light.

To finish the work I plait a long chord from 100% waxed cotton, in my experience this thread is extremely strong and durable. I flame work my own toggle from boro-silicate glass and bind it into the chord.

Voila!

Amulet Statement

Amulets | Jewellery thought to give protection against evil, danger or disease.

Oxford Dictionary

I have been working with the manifestation of Amulets in glass since 2004. I hold strong spiritual and physical ties to my birth-land Aotearoa. I am excited by the serendipitous nature of hot glass, in this hot state I like to give the material as much freedom of expression as I can facilitate. I love carving glass dramatically and working with surface textures to refract and reflect light. In the end, I hope to create an object that holds power for those that wear it.

The Matrix jewellery works are mostly created in the small hours of the night, in the quiet and under the blanket of darkness. The night beholds the most contemplative hours of my
daily clock. I weave threads whilst travelling along complicated roads of thought. Perplexed by how to change our current global trajectory whilst upholding my belief in the power of
humanity and community to change our priorities and the way we exist.

The Matrix jewellery series is the natural evolution to previous work titled ‘Synergetic Series’. The Synergetic sculptures are derived from the study of natural systems and influenced by the philosophies and design science of the most notable American, Buck Minster-Fuller.

ARTIST STATEMENT

The concept behind the artwork, Our One World Island, is to bring attention to the importance of the world’s oceans and the need to take care of them.

Our oceans cover 71 per cent of the planet and largely govern our climate by performing the majority of the world’s photosynthesis, the production of our oxygen. They support organisms such as phytoplankton which clean as much CO2 from the atmosphere each year as all rainforests.

Evidence suggests ocean currents are slowing down and/or could stop if cold fresh water makes its way into the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. This could occur if global warming causes large-scale melting of arctic sea ice and the Greenland ice sheet. This halt in the current could take centuries or just a few years. Either would cause planet-wide devastating changes in climate.

The Dymaxion Map, was created by mathematician, inventor and futurist, R. Buckminster Fuller. The Dymaxion Map is widely considered the most accurate rendition of the relationships of the earth’s continents.

By turning the globe into a series of triangles Fuller could unfold the Earth from a sphere into a flat plane and detail the land formations and their relationships to each other with tremendous accuracy. Our One World Island encapsulates these ideas to create a poetic expression of the fragility of our planet bringing to the forefront a consciousness of the world’s oceans.

The work was developed to satisfy the context and design of the foyer, surrounded by glass and highly visible through the night the Dymaxion map was erected onto a wall of Barrisol with a series of 1400 LED lights installed behind, the wall is programmed to change colour at certain time durations.

My concept for the illumination of the wall has two elements, the chosen colours and time/duration. The colours are in response to seasonal shifts; in the crisp icy cool of winter a warm earthy range would illuminate the foyer space creating a sense of comfort and wellbeing, in the heat of summer the colours would be changed to a crisp cool spectrum offering refreshing respite from the intensity of the heat and humidity. My choice of saturation was low creating a subtle suggestion of this warmth and coolness to purposefully allow the focus to be directed towards the Dymaxion map and the concept & content of the work Our One World Island.

The desired time duration of the colour loop was to be a 30-hour cycle, with a suggested hold of an hour for each colour with a half hour fade in/out time to the next. The notion being; if one travelled passed and/or arrived at the building at the same time each day the colour/mood would be different, the work would be seen to be evolving, alive and withholding a personality, inspiring investigation and inviting a sense of a relationship with the work. The change in colour would not be noticeable if you stood in front of the work for a short period but rather it would be recognised if you were in a meeting for an hour and returned to the foyer, I believe the speed of change would support a calm and grounded mood within the building.

The Synergetic forms, as sculpture, illustrate the motion of making, singular cells lay idle until fused together with others to form a whole. The act of hot construction, orchestrated by the team becomes a metaphor for the scientifically based ‘poetics of experience’.

Elements join together at the point of least resistance, the strength and integrity of form becoming a witness to the materiality of consciousness and unconscious.

The simple blown bubble holds the dynamism of inside and outside space. Light is trapped within and hovers over the surface. I enjoy the meditative time taken carving the surface of the Urchin. Using traditional Venetian techniques of Battuto my mind drifts and travels as so do my hands. The blown form slowly transforms into a hieroglyphic transcript of experience. Working the surface through multiple processes creates a depth to the space that the Urchin occupies and those that wear it.

Materials & Methodology

The Urchin form is firstly blown in the hot shop, a colour is chosen and blown into a tube it is then divided into small spherical forms.

Cooled down to room temperature the Urchin ‘blank’ is carved into a more defined form using a lathe, the glass may pass through two grades of diamond before being ready for the next process.

Now the Urchin is in it’s final form I move to the smaller engraving lathe to work on the surface texture. Small diamond wheels are used to carve marks in the surface, this technique is inspired and developed from the traditional Venetian technique known as Battuto. I can choose from a number of wheels with different profiles in both stone and diamond all delivering very different effects upon the glass. It takes considerable time to work the entire surface of the Urchin, the form will be checked over and over to see that no area has gone untouched.

Once satisfied with the result I hand rub the surface with fine emery to polish the high ground, the different textures and treatments become highlighted when seen under moving light.

To finish the work I plait a long chord from 100% waxed cotton, this thread is extremely strong and durable. I flame work my own toggle from boro-silicate glass and bind it to the chord.

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